FILM CLUB THE GUERNSEY LITERARY, POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY

FILM CLUB THE GUERNSEY LITERARY, POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY

REVIEW
This is another book adaptation and perhaps suffers from the problem discussed last time of condensing a book into the short space of two hours. The film constantly shifts between post-war Britain and wartime Guernsey, most glaringly in the opening sequences when it flits between the harsh restrictions of Nazi rule on a rural community in 1941 and the upward trajectory of young London author Juliet Ashton (Lily James) in 1946. As the film progresses, the contrast allows Juliet to learn of the deprivations of the Guernsey village community, although she does have her own tragic back story. However, the lurching contrasts between genteel humour and wartime struggle and austerity made for a very uneven emotional tone: where we supposed to feel anxious and empathetic or to anticipate a feel-good journey of young writer to success? As the film unfolds, a mystery opens up around an apparently heroic woman on the island who no longer lives there but around whom there is a veil of silence. Yet the mystery fails to intrigue enough and the mystery is revealed quite quickly in a rather predictable way. Meanwhile, Juliet's story and a tug between her romance with a US officer and her fondness for the island community also develops in a way that seemed to me formulaic. There are some good performances and it was nice to see Bristol, the SS Balmoral and a familiar Cornish seaside location, but it didn't feel very authentic to me. Verdict: 6/10. Lindsay

Really enjoyed it as good story and well acted. I’d probably watch again even though I’ve now seen 3 times. It’s a bit like the Bridget Jones moves!!! Score: 8. Suey

Bill : Score: 8.5.